The famous Tube Stations of Central London

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tube station

The Tube is the thing that really keeps London going. Forget about taxis and even the iconic red London buses, it’s the underground trains that whizz around the capital delivering commuters, Londoners, and tourists around that’s the real winner.

First opened in 1863, some stations have become famous even beyond their wildest dreams. You can tour them during your stay at Montcalm hotels and even find a favourite.

Oxford Circus

You’re almost certain to come through Oxford Circus at some point during your stay—especially if you’ve been staying in hotels City of London. This station is famous for its four exit points onto Oxford Street, one of the busiest shopping streets in Europe. It’s also quite pretty inside—though the station was opened in 1900 and has been refurbished since them, some of the murals added in the 1980s still remain.

Waterloo

Waterloo is the busiest station in all of London, which is an impressive title to claim and also a hint to tourists to stay away from it during rush hour. Some of the older platforms curve round instead of being a straight line like other tube stations, and with the traditional tile of Tube platforms makes it look like something out of a London postcard.

Victoria

The Victoria line was named after one of Britain’s most famous queens, and Victoria station also bears her name. Opened in 1868, it’s actually featured as a plot point in various famous plays and short stories from this time. In The Importance of Being Earnest, a play by Oscar Wilde, one of the main characters was found abandoned at the station as a baby inside a handbag. Even the famous fictional detective Sherlock Holmes sends Dr. Watson away from here, to escape an evil villain.

King’s Cross

King’s Cross underground station is more popularly known as King’s Cross St. Pancras, as two overground stations meet here. It was first opened in 1863 and is the second-busiest underground station in the whole of London. Harry Potter fans will remember that the titular character has to find his way from the underground station to a secret platform that will take him to his magical school. The Pet Shop Boys even recorded a song named after the underground station.

Mornington Crescent

Mornington Crescent is in Camden Town, and although tourists who don’t want to go there might miss it, they’ll be missing out on a lot of fun. It was closed from 1992 in an attempt to fix up some of the lifts, but the work was dragged on for six years. However, the popular radio show I’m Sorry I Haven’t a Clue had created a game named after the station, and launched a campaign to have the station be opened again. In 1998, the work was completed and the cast of the radio show opened the station, complete with a plaque commemorating their work in helping it remain open. If you pass through Mornington Crescent, try to spot it!

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